"Pathelogical Snoopy Nose"

**Note** You have to be a Dick Van Dyke fan to get the header.

My husband thinks I’m a snoop. But since we’re out of money for big household projects (although we bought WD-40 to loosen up the front door lock! 🙂 )  I’m reduced to watching the neighbors do theirs.

My report this week is that the neighbor is ruining his house. Ok, not totally, but you be the judge:

This is the old window:

Old Window

And this is the new one:
New Window

I totally understand needing to keep the heat bills down, but YUCK! I hate the creme. And the new ones have none of the charm of the old ones. Opinions?

share this:

Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest

More articles:

Route 66 – Around the Web

In another one of our attempts to save you looking for all the best resources. I thought I’d give you links to my new (or at least newly renewed) passion of Route 66. Because of publicity, movies like “Cars” and other ways of generating awareness, Route 66 is one of the best “known” preservation efforts centered around mid-Century. From Wikipedia: U.S. Route 66 (also known as the Will Rogers Highway and colloquially known as the

Read More

Can you help with a floorplans?

I got an email from Amanda Bennett from LAIKA Entertainment in Portland Oregon and she is searching for floorplans of suburban homes on the East Coast during the 50s and 60s. She’s come across a whole lot of West Coast homes – the classic mid-century angular and new home… but she’s actually looking for what the interiors of more traditional homes… the Cape Cod, updated Colonials, Westchester NY, bedroom community homes. Any ideas? Post here

Read More

Mies van der Rohe’s gas station in Montreal preservation success!

It’s wonderful when we can report a Mid-Century preservation success: “Long, low and in his trademark black steel, the shuttered-since-2008 Esso station by Bauhaus master Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, at boulevard de l’Île des Soeurs and rue Berlioz in Montreal’s Nuns’ Island community, currently lies stripped of a little of its beauty – huge sheets of glass and their associated mullions have been numbered and disassembled for restoration – but by autumn, the building

Read More