Two great Route 66 Exhibits in New Mexico – Catch them before they’re gone!

Until October 2nd at the Albuquerque History Museum and conceived in honor of the 90th anniversary of Route 66, this exhibition celebrates the art, history and popular culture of the iconic Mother Road.

Too often the history of Route 66 in Albuquerque has been overlooked, even though our city sits at the center of the Southwestern leg of the route and boasts, at 16 miles, the longest single-city urban stretch of the highway in the nation. We are also the only place on the Mother Road where the highway crosses itself! Indeed the very re-routing of Route 66 to the east-west alignment was a political scandal, but shaved time and miles off the odometers of road-weary travelers and their automobiles.

Can’t see it?  Enjoy a preview of the exhibition 

Albuquerque Museum
2000 Mountain Road NW
Albuquerque, NM 87104route662
Phone: 505.243.7255

America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66

Just through the end of this week, The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History is hosting “America’s Road: The Journey of Route 66,” special exhibition that shares the history and fascination of one of the world’s most famous highways. route661Surrounded by stories, artifacts, music, memorable images and interactive and engaging elements, visitors will experience a geographical and historical tour of the iconic highway, Route 66.

The exhibit includes an original Ford Mustang alongside artifacts and photographs depicting classic Route 66 service stations, motor courts, cafes, public art installations and more.

The rest of the museum is fabulous for Mid-century fans as well, with exhibits of mid-century furniture, pop culture items and other “Atomic Age” items and historic information:

The National Museum of Nuclear Science & History

601 Eubank Blvd SE
Albuquerque, NM 87123
(505) 245-2137

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