Happy Retro Turkey day!

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Ohio House Motel Chicago – a survivor

Distinguished by its fabulous diamond shaped exterior, the Ohio House is a fabulous example of mid-century architecture right in the middle of downtown Chicago. Other architectural points of interest include the matching suspended sign, held up by a geometric metal grid which is itself reflected in the pattern block fence that runs along Ohio Street. Rough-faced stone walls and a large stainless steel sign on the east facade add to it’s distinctly Chicago Mid-Century design.

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Pam's 1st annual Useless but Wonderful Contest

Well, the holidays are kicking in here….and I’ve been a little slack about my houseblog. I realized today that I’d been missing a ton when I found out about this: Pam at Retro Renovation’s 1st Annual Useless but Wonderful contest!  So, here’s my submission…and yes, I’ve had this sitting around in the house for 7 years. I have NO idea what to do with it and really don’t want to cut it up. So, here

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Movie Manor in Monte Vista Colorado is a mid-century treasure!

When our staff first went on the search for Mid-Century Motels, we were looking for family friendly clean motels that have kept and celebrated the 50’s motel style. The Best Western Movie Manor in Monte Vista Colorado is all that and more! Part of the Best Western chain, the Best Western Movie Manor is located on the same property as a historic drive-in movie theater, which means guests can watch G rated – family-friendly movies

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Blame the 50’s for our Credit issues!

Nowadays, receiving a bank credit card is standard procedure upon opening a checking account. But when exactly did bank cards become a part of our culture? Crediting the Mid-Century with the introduction of, well, credit would be historically inaccurate. . .the practice dates back to the late 1800s with inventions such as charge plates and credit coins. The bank card, however, was invented in 1946 by a Brooklyn banker, John Biggins. The card was called

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